Saturday, August 26, 2017

Sun Tzu: A Great Sage Among The Great




The number of great minds that operated during the Warring States Period is simply baffling. There was Confucius and his philosophical successors, notably Mencius and Hsün Tzu. Also prevalent were the major Daoist (or Taoist) intellectuals like Lao Tzu and Chuang Tzu. Later, there were the philosophers of authoritarianism and legalism, such as Lord Shang and Han Fei Tzu. Also present was the religious wildcard, Mo Tzu, who preached universal love and told of a personified Heaven that punished evil and rewarded good. Nevertheless, during this highly congested time period filled with so many geniuses, there lived a military strategist who would surpass all others in popularity and fame (except, perhaps, Confucius and Lao Tzu)—he was Master Sun, better known as Sun Tzu.

All images used in the production of this video were Public Domain or licensed for reuse via the Creative Commons or Flickr. If the image was not Public Domain, the license was included in its respective slide.

The intro music was written and performed by C. Keith Hansley for use on The Historian's Hut YouTube channel.

The calm and serene sounds in the background of the video is:
River Fire Kevin MacLeod (incompetech.com)
Licensed under Creative Commons: By Attribution 3.0 License
http://creativecommons.org/licenses/b...

Thanks for Watching!

Read our biography about Sun Tzu, HERE.

Check out other quote pictures from Sun Tzu, HERE.

Take a look at more Chinese quote pictures, HERE.

Return to the quote picture home page, HERE

Tuesday, August 15, 2017

10 Wise Quotes From Marcus Aurelius



When Emperor Marcus Aurelius (121-180 CE) was not occupied with war, he attempted to rule his empire in a just and humane way. He was charitable to provinces in need, and he generally tried to combat corruption and maltreatment. His greatest flaw in his pursuit of justice was the persecution of Christians that occurred during his reign. The massacres during his rule produced numerous well-known martyrs, such as Justin of Rome and Polycarp of Smyrna.

The emperor was drawn to stoic philosophy, and was, himself, considered a competent philosopher. Marcus Aurelius' Meditations are still widely enjoyed and admired, to this very day.

All images used in the creation of this video are classified as Public Domain via Creative Commons.

The intro theme was written and performed by C. Keith Hansley for use on this YouTube channel.

The calming lute music in the background:
Suonatore di Liuto Kevin MacLeod (incompetech.com)
Licensed under Creative Commons: By Attribution 3.0 License
http://creativecommons.org/licenses/b...

Enjoy and thanks for watching!

Read our biography on the philosopher-emperor, Marcus Aurelius, HERE.

Check out our hundreds of quote pictures, Here, and the quote pictures specifically featuring the quotes from this video, HERE.


Friday, July 21, 2017

Sun Tzu: The General





Broadly speaking, Sun Tzu’s life, death and the recording of his sayings into The Art of War occurred between the 6th and 3rd century BCE. Most of what is perceived to be known about Sun Tzu primarily comes from either the Records of the Grand Historian by Sima Qian (145-85 BCE) or The Spring and Autumn Annals detailing events from around 722-481 BCE in the Zhou Dynasty. 
 
Based on Sima Qian’s work, Sun Tzu is thought to have been a contemporary of Confucius, living around 551-479 BCE. He was likely born in Ch’i (or Qi), in the modern Shandong Province. He eventually found employment in the court of King Ho-Lu (or He Lü) of Wu (in modern Zhejiang), who likely reigned from 514-496 BCE. On a more solid historical note, the Kingdom of Wu was a major participant of the Warring States Period, and King Ho-Lu (r. 514-496 BCE) is widely believed to have been an actual king of the Kingdom of Wu. 
 
Sun Tzu is often mentioned in commentary on the Wu-Chu Wars that occurred between 512-506 BCE. In particular, Master Sun supposedly played a major role in Wu’s victory over Chu in the Battle of Boju (506 BCE), when the strategist commanded Wu’s forces, along with King Ho-Lu and the king’s brother, Fugai. It remains historically suspicious, though, that Master Sun’s name is absent from one of the major prime sources describing King Ho-Lu’s time period—The Zou Commentary. Nevertheless, by the time of the Han Dynasty (around 206 BCE-220 CE), The Art of War, and its supposed author, Sun Tzu, were widely known household names in China.

Sun Tzu had a unique philosophy on war—he was utterly ruthless, and yet, he would go above and beyond in his attempts to avoid unnecessary confrontation. Sun Tzu’s ideal victory would involve deploying spies to discover an enemy’s vulnerabilities, followed by espionage, sabotage and diplomacy to exploit those weaknesses.  He would force the enemy into submission without raising a single weapon. If war was unavoidable, then Sun Tzu would rely on a system of military moves and countermoves and rigorous preparation and training to ensure victory.

All images used in this video are either Public Domain or appropriately licensed for use via Creative Commons.


The intro-music was written and recorded by C. Keith Hansley for use on The Historian’s Hut YouTube channel.

The catchy song throughout the remainder of the video:
Indore Kevin MacLeod (incompetech.com)
Licensed under Creative Commons: By Attribution 3.0 License
http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/3.0/

Thank you and enjoy!

Check out other Sun Tzu quote pictures, HERE.

Take a look at other war quotes, HERE.

Read our Sun Tzu biography, HERE.

Return to the quote picture home page, HERE.

Friday, June 2, 2017

Let's Draw History (Poorly): The Battle of Verdun


At the onset of the war, Germany had pressed quickly through Belgium into France, but became bogged down well shy of Paris, and the war gridlocked into WWI’s iconic trench warfare. In early 1916, however, General Erich von Falkenhayn of Germany believed he knew a way to crush France and weaken Britain’s will to fight—by seizing the French defensive position at Verdun.

All images, maps and graphics used in the construction of this video are licensed as Public Domain in the Creative Commons.

Intro music written and performed by C. Keith Hansley for use on this channel.

Background music:
Interloper by Kevin MacLeod is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution license (https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/)
Source: http://incompetech.com/music/royalty-free/index.html?isrc=USUAN1100401
Artist: http://incompetech.com/

Sources:
Warfare in the Western World: Military Operations Since 1871 (Volume II) by Robert A. Doughty and Ira D. Gruber et al. Massachusetts: D. C. Heath and Company, 1996.
http://www.history.com/this-day-in-history/german-troops-capture-fort-douaumont-verdun
http://www.ww1battlefields.co.uk/verdun/douaumont.html

Wednesday, May 3, 2017

Diogenes the Cynic, The Mad Genius Philosopher of Ancient Greece



During the late 5th century BCE, one of the most bizarre men to have ever lived was born in the Greek-colonized city of Sinope, located on the coast of the Black Sea in modern Turkey. His name was Diogenes, and he would go on to impress and astound many of the great names from ancient Greece. The renowned philosopher, Plato, supposedly described Diogenes of Sinope as a “Socrates gone mad” and Alexander the Great (according to Plutarch) honored the man by saying, “If I were not Alexander, I would be Diogenes.”

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All images used in creating this video are Public Domain or licensed for public use via Creative Commons.

The intro song was written and performed by C. Keith Hansley for use only on this channel.

Check out our article on Diogenes the Cynic, HERE, for a more in-depth account of this strange, but intriguing, philosopher.

Wednesday, April 26, 2017

15 Wise Quotes From Confucius, Mencius and Xunzi


Many of the greatest thinkers the world has ever known were born in ancient China. Confucius (6th-5th century BCE) and his protégés, Mencius (4th-3rd century BCE) and Xunzi (4th-3rd Century BCE), were three of these great minds. Here are 15 wise quotes from the Confucian school  of philosophy written by the three above-mentioned men.

Quotes from Confucius were translated by Arthur Waley (Vintage Books, 1989).

Quotes from Mencius were translated by D. C. Lau (Penguin Classics, 2004).

Quotes from Xunzi were translated by Burton Watson (Columbia University Press, 1996).

All images used in creating this video are public domain via Creative Commons.

The intro music was performed and recorded by C. Keith Hansley for use only on The Historian's Hut YouTube channel.

The music playing throughout the quotes is:
Healing by Kevin MacLeod is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution license (https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/)
Source: http://incompetech.com/music/royalty-free/index.html?isrc=USUAN1200048
Artist: http://incompetech.com/

Check out our biographis on Confucius (HERE) and Mencius (HERE).

Wednesday, March 29, 2017

Let's Find History In Skyrim: Episode 3, Sheogorath, Dionysus and Loki


If you enjoyed the video, subscribe to our YouTube channel, HERE.

In this episode, we journey to the city of Solitude to hunt down the Daedric ‘Prince of Madness,’ Sheogorath. As we complete the tasks the mad god gives us, we compare Sheogorath to the Greek and Roman god, Dionysus (Bacchus or Liber Pater), and the trickster of the Norse gods, Loki.

The intro music was written and performed by C. Keith Hansley for use on this YouTube channel.

All images used in this video (and its thumbnail) are Public Domain.

Look up articles about Norse mythology, HERE.

Check out our article on Dionysus, HERE.


Watch all of our Let's Find History In Skyrim Videos, HERE.